How To Send The ‘’Perfect’’ Employer Email

You might have an outstanding CV with years of experience under your belt, but imagine putting all that effort in to be eliminated before they even open your application…

Employers are generally quite specific in what they want to see included in emails and how they should be structured (e.g. format, subject line, etc.). Play by their rules if you want to avoid being eliminated in the first round.

While this might seem such a small piece of the application process, getting this right sets you up with professionalism that EVERY employer likes to see. Before you send another email in your frenzies of applications, it’s crucial to understand the structure needed to get your email read every time.

This article breaks down everything you need to know so you can send your resume to recruiters in the right way.

First, you should take care of the following rules:

  1. Recruiters always look at your email address before even considering opening the email. Since your address is the first thing people will see, make sure it sounds professional with your first and last name on it. Try not to use emails you’ve had since your youth with names such as ‘’dragongamer12@gmail.com.’’ Keep it simple with your first and last name and try to avoid using nicknames.
  1. Second, search for and enter the email address of the recipient. In the subject line, say why you are sending the message. 
  1. Greet the recruiter by name and tell them who you are and why you are sending them an email, and close the letter with courtesy and sign your full name at the end. 
  1. Click the “attach” button to include your CV and cover letter in the chat message. 
  1. Lastly, check to make sure everything is formatted correctly and no mistakes have been made.

So how do you know how to apply these rules in the most impressive manner? Below covers every detail into each of the topics so you can ace the application process.

Write An Employer Attractive Subject Line

As a person writing a job application, it’s important to write a clear subject line that tells the employer what the email is about, while making sure your email doesn’t end up in the employer’s junk folder. When all the letters in a subject are capitalised and the subject is wrong, it can lead to the junk section.

In the subject line, you should include the job title, your name, the recipient’s name, and (if asked) the job reference number. Including all of this information makes it easier for the recruiter to find you, but including the name of the recruiter makes it much easier for you to find that specific application when checking it’s status.

Be Clear About Why You’re Writing.

Make sure that your email clearly says what you want it to say while getting straight to the point as to why you’re emailing. Sometimes, the assistant or PA goes through all the emails before the employer does. Therefore you need to make sure your email is one to remember if you want it to end up in the employers inbox.

Don’t go on a tangent of unnecessary info for too long about why you’re the best fit for the role. Make it clear and concise and attach your CV and cover letter to the email.

Structure Your Email Body Professionally

Start the body of your email with a simple greeting like “Hello,” “Hi,” or “Dear.” When you greet someone, use their first name. If the job posting doesn’t list the employer’s name, you can address them as “Dear Sir/Madam” or “Dear hiring manager.”

Make sure to add a signature at the end of your email for that final touch of professionalism. This lets the employer know who you are and how to reach you. And if applicable, adding a link to your website or blog is a great finishing touch.

Instead of a cover letter, send a short message. People often need to send cover letters with their job applications. But if you don’t, put a short message in the beginning of the email that says why you’re interested in the job, your name, and the best way to reach you.

As mentioned previously, don’t write thousand word essays within your email. Keep it concise or chances are the employer won’t read it.

Make sure you don’t mail the cover letter. Instead, send it as an attachment, either as a Word doc or a PDF. This makes it much easier for the hiring manager to send your document to other people in the same company.

Ending The Email

Using a sign-off/signature is a way to add a touch of professionalism to your email. There are some great signature templates to choose from. Add links to your website and social media pages to keep it simple.

A sophisticated look could be achieved by using black, white, or navy blue. After “yours sincerely,” put your first name, where you live, and how to reach you.

Proofread, Proofread, Proofread

Proofread, proofread, proofread. Check for all kinds of mistakes and make sure to check every single syllable in your email, because once an employer sees just one mistake, your chances of hearing back drop to zero. Ask someone in your friend group or family to read through so no errors go unnoticed.

Sending an email to yourself first to see how it looks as a whole is also a good idea.

When Should You Send The Email?

We’ve talked about how to email a CV effectively in order to ace the application process. In the same way, the timing of when you send it is also important. Monday and Tuesday are the best days to send emails because that’s when employers are most likely to check their email.

Monday and Tuesday are the first days of the work week, so it’s likely that you’ll get a call for an interview on one of those days. But the employers most likely have much more on their plate further on in the week.

The Finishing Touches

Now you have all the information needed to create and send the ‘’perfect’’ employer email, go out there and send some emails! Keep these factors in mind throughout the entire process, and don’t forget to check through everything you write for errors.

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